The funeral industry in America began to 除甲醛服務 form after the Civil War with the advent of embalming – a technique that allowed the preservation, transportation and see of soldiers killed on distant battlefields. At the turn of the 20th century, funeral stewards, then known as ‘funeral stewards’ or ‘funeral stewards’, combined this process of preserving the body with the ability to ‘significantly improve the appearance of the deceased through ‘restorative art’, creating a more pleasant viewing experience. . for friends and family.

Products such as caskets, which at the time were called “caskets”, were also offered by a growing number of funeral stewards and were mainly produced by local furniture manufacturers. As America became more urbanized, funeral stewards stopped preparing and displaying bodies in the family home and instead began taking the dead out of their homes or hospitals and taking them to funeral homes specifically designed to train and demonstrate them.

Today, there are about 22,000 funeral homes in the United States, of which approximately 20 per cent are owned by national and regional unifiers. Recent trends in ritual services include:

The constant increase in the number of cremations, which means that more and more funeral homes are building crematoria.

Reducing the standard three-day service (two days to visit and the third for funeral and burial) to two days with one day of visit. In fact, many families now prefer that funerals and burials be held immediately after the visit, allowing the entire funeral and burial process to be completed in one day.

A steady increase in the number of people who plan and finance their funerals in advance, thus preventing their loved ones from facing these problems at the time of death.

Funeral homes are moving from providing standard funeral services to more event centres, responding to requests from families for greater flexibility and setting up the ceremonies themselves.

The funeral industry in America began to form after the Civil War with the advent of embalming – a technique that allowed the preservation, transportation and see of soldiers killed on distant battlefields. At the turn of the 20th century, funeral stewards, then known as ‘funeral stewards’ or ‘funeral stewards’, combined this process of preserving the body with the ability to ‘significantly improve the appearance of the deceased through ‘restorative art’, creating a more pleasant viewing experience. . for friends and family.

Products such as caskets, which at the time were called “caskets”, were also offered by a growing number of funeral stewards and were mainly produced by local furniture manufacturers. As America became more urbanized, funeral stewards stopped preparing and displaying bodies in the family home and instead began taking the dead out of their homes or hospitals and taking them to funeral homes specifically designed to train and demonstrate them.

Today, there are about 22,000 funeral homes in the United States, of which approximately 20 per cent are owned by national and regional unifiers. Recent trends in ritual services include:

The constant increase in the number of cremations, which means that more and more funeral homes are building crematoria.

Reducing the standard three-day service (two days to visit and the third for funeral and burial) to two days with one day of visit. In fact, many families now prefer that funerals and burials be held immediately after the visit, allowing the entire funeral and burial process to be completed in one day.

A steady increase in the number of people who plan and finance their funerals in advance, thus preventing their loved ones from facing these problems at the time of death.

Funeral homes are moving from providing standard funeral services to more event centres, responding to requests from families for greater flexibility and setting up the ceremonies themselves.

Today’s chests are different monochrome and omebre with different angles, including square, round and in the shape of urns. The price of the product is also affected by the interior materials, including sarja and crepe at the bottom, where flax and velour are more expensive. These materials are trimmed with thermal and sewn folds, manual or machine adjustment, special padding and embroidery on the hood panel (internal coating). External equipment used by funeral stewards and pallet carriers to transport the box includes fixed and hinge handles stamped or framed. Recent innovations in safe design include “memory boxes” for storing special personal items that can be buried with the dead, and removable corner elements that serve as a family souvenir after the service.

Cremation urns

Cremation urns are relatively small containers designed to store some, but usually not all, of the 3-6 pounds of cremated remains (“cremains”) formed as a result of cremation of an adult’s body. The steady increase in cremations in the United States over the past few decades has led to a dramatic increase in the number of cremation products available for the transportation and storage of creams known as “ashes”. Available building materials include composites, metal, wood, stone such as marble and granite, fabric, ceramics, plastic, glass and biodegradable materials for use on water.

The design options for cremation urns are now virtually limitless: topics representing consumer preferences, including traditional vases, various wildlife, flowers and plants, patriotism, religion and public service for former and current members, the army, police and firefighters. Another interesting product line that has grown over the last 20 years is cremation jewelry. Medallion-type products are designed to contain a very small number of creams of the deceased, while other products contain a real artificial stone, formed during the intensive compression of the creams of the deceased.

Industry trends

Although ritual services in America are slowly changing, several important trends have emerged in recent years. First, and it is not surprising that advances in technology have led to the emergence of obituaries on the Internet that complement or replace those traditionally published in local newspapers. These online obituaries are a complete tribute to the dead and offer virtually unlimited content including text, photos, videos, music and reviews of site visitors, and remain available for years. Although this is not yet accepted, even webcast funeral services are starting to appear.

Religion plays a lesser role in modern funerals as services become more informal, and roles that have historically been assigned to pastors, priests and rabbis are performed by family members or friends, and in some cases by professional revellers acting as MC. For the whole ceremony. Dishes traditionally prepared and served in the family prayer house after the service moved from the basement of the church to restaurants, public clubs, hotels or business events. Religious hymns are replaced by music that better reflects the tastes of the deceased and his circle of friends.

Without a doubt, the most noticeable trend in ritual services today is personalization. The move to individual memorial services has evolved over the past 15 years, with families asking funeral managers to allow the display of artefacts from the lives of the dead, such as golf clubs, memorabilia or videos. Traffic boards with photos of the dead throughout their lives have become commonplace as families look for ways to create an environment to celebrate the lives of their loved ones.

Now the infamous baby boomer generation will take this personalization to the next level. Baby boomers, born between 1945 and 1964, have always played by their own rules, changing everything they touched, from music to politics, to reflect their rigid independence.